Peter Scaminaci3

Peter Scaminaci

Senior Vice President and Executive Director

New York“I see people enter our programs struggling, and to witness them move successfully through the treatment process is wonderfully rewarding."

Peter Scaminaci has 20 years of experience in strategic healthcare management. Prior to joining Phoenix House, he was the assistant vice president of clinical operations at Kingsbrook Jewish Medical Center, a community hospital in central Brooklyn. He worked at the medical center for nearly eight years, where he enjoyed connecting with the public he served. Peter was later recruited by North Shore University Hospital, one of the region’s largest quaternary healthcare institutions, as the associate executive director for clinical and ancillary services. Recognized for implementing keen analytic abilities and harnessing a team approach to deliver operational success, he holds an MBA and MS in Healthcare Management from St. Joseph’s College in Brooklyn, New York.

Peter was drawn to Phoenix House’s vital mission and visible community impact. He was eager to be part of an organization that touches the lives of individuals and families in a clear way: “I see people enter our programs struggling, and to witness them move successfully through the treatment process is wonderfully rewarding,” he said.

Peter’s number one priority now is to combat the opioid addiction epidemic that has shattered communities in New York and across the country. “More and more, we see that the people entering many of our programs are almost exclusively addicted to opioids,” he said. He is dedicated to providing the resources necessary to get the community back on its feet.

Our clients, who are so committed to recovery, motivate Peter. He is proud to support programs that provide the critical treatment that individuals and families need. “What strikes me about Phoenix House’s impact is the outpouring of heartwarming success stories from clients,” Peter said. He recalls meeting parents who were visiting their 16-year-old. They told him their son’s story—how he fell in with the wrong crowd and subsequently went down the wrong path—but today his parents are amazed by his transformation as an individual. He is a “nice, nice kid,” Peter said, “and when I see an effect like that not just on a young man but his entire family, I know we’re making a difference.”