Carole Ann Scott

Carole-Ann Scott

Program Director

California“We can help students understand that it’s okay to ask for help, and it’s okay to be imperfect. We help teens deal with bullying and low self-esteem by showing them that who they are can come from inside."

As Program Director of Phoenix House’s Behavioral Health Intervention & Support Services (BHIS), Carole-Ann Scott draws on her background in education and passion for working with young people. She has a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Hunter College and a master’s degree in clinical psychology from Antioch University. Before joining Phoenix House, Carole-Ann directed a non-public school, and she opened a charter school in 2003. During her time working in education, she witnessed the prolific use of substances among California’s youth, and in 2009 she joined the Phoenix House team as Deputy Director of mental health care at Phoenix House Academy in Los Angeles.

Carole-Ann was drawn to Phoenix House because of its unique, well-established system that is open to incorporating new treatment modalities. “It’s exciting to utilize new, cutting-edge methodologies while helping young people,” she said.

The BHIS program focuses on preventing teens from using drugs or developing mental health disorders or behavioral symptoms. One of the greatest challenges that Carole-Ann sees teens coping with today is managing high expectations and elevated stress levels. Because today’s workloads are larger than in previous years, kids may be more likely to react with aggressive behavior or substance use to manage stress, anxiety, and nervousness. BHIS provides young people with tools and strategies to deal with daily challenges in a healthy way.

As a parent of three college-age young adults, Carole-Ann understands the importance of self-esteem, identity, and appreciating young people as their own individuals. “We can help students understand that it’s okay to ask for help, and it’s okay to be imperfect. We help teens deal with bullying and low self-esteem by showing them that who they are can come from inside—it’s not just about their favorite sports figures or TV stars. Young people can define who they are.”